Conspiracy Theory Leads To Inaction And Apathy

I have been saying for a long time that conspiracy theory leads to inaction.  This comes from my observations of conspiracy theorists both in and out of the so called manosphere (but particularly those in the so called manosphere) who are ideologically opposed to any action against feminism particularly anything involving political organization.  They come with absurd BS reasons like “any mens rights organization would be controlled by the NWO”.

Conspiracy theorists apply the same inaction and apathy to their personal lives.  All their talk about game is just a smokescreen for their failures to get laid.  After reading manosphere blogs, it becomes obvious that these guys never leave the house (probably because they believe that’s what the NWO wants them to do).  This is why the so called manosphere has no use for a man who is actually trying to get women.

It turns that my observations have been scientifically studied and validated.  Two studies done at the University of Kent showed two things.

  1. “Exposure to information supporting conspiracy theories reduced participants’ intentions to engage in politics, relative to participants who were given information refuting conspiracy theories”
  2. “Exposure to information supporting conspiracy theories increased feelings of powerlessness” which made them want to engage in politics less

This proves that any conspiracy theory is the enemy of the MRM.  Anyone who is serious about mens rights is going to have to act against feminism and organize politically.  Since it has been scientifically validated that conspiracy theory leads to political inaction and apathy, conspiracy theory sabotages the MRM simply by being near the MRM.  This is why we must oppose any conspiracy theory in the MRM.  We can’t even tolerate just a little conspiracy theory in the MRM because that just opens the door to refusing to act against feminism.

There is no benefit whatsoever to having conspiracy theorists in the MRM.

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29 comments on “Conspiracy Theory Leads To Inaction And Apathy

  1. Pingback: Conspiracy Theory Leads To Inaction And Apathy | The Black Pill

  2. “any mens rights organization would be controlled by the NWO”

    I can certainly see ultra feminists thinking this way, what with all their ranting about “the patriarchy” & such….it just boggles my mind why any regular guy would be inclined to think this way, unless they actually want to have sex with the nutjob ultra-feminazis(**shudder**).

    • No….reality simply reveals the opposite: it’s the present feminized society that was planned by who one might, if inclined, refer to as “TPTB”, “The Man”, “The NWO” well before probably anyone reading this blog was born. As far as I see, “The Conspiracy” already happened, right in front of everyone, and it’s what has America $16 trillion in the hole, and it’s this idea that a bunch of know-nothing “alpha” breeders deserve the fruits of other people’s hard labor in the form of massive amounts of welfare, huge houses in formerly-quiet suburban neighborhoods(before they arrived), preferrential hiring, free this and free that simply for exhibiting “alpha” traits, simply because our government idiots LOVE “alpha” behavior, which is viewed by The Dumbasses In Charge as activities including(though not neccessarily limited to) heavy consumption of drugs(legal/illegal) and alcohol, criminality, psychosis, sociopathy, nihilism, violence, murder, dishonesty, narcissism, greed, self-destruction and an endless hatred of anything(and anyone) good, and of course sex, sex and more fucking sex, to keep on breeding an endless supply of motherfucking little hellspawn, just like them, for the government idiots to observe and admire. The present economic situation dictates this fairy tale world of theirs will implode harshly eventually(perhaps sooner than later), and I can’t wait to see the dead bodies. Great blog. Keep up the good work, guys.

      • “Conspiracy theorists” will ultimately be drawn to this site, because they have seen things, through research, that contradict mainstream thought, as propagated by the media. This site (though it’s my first time here) seems to tackle radical feminism (promoted by the media), which is in line with the idea that our traditional culture is under attack, and that we are being manipulated and lied to on a daily basis. I understand the need to maintain focus on this website, so if I return I will try to stay “on topic,” but I think it’s a mistake to label people as “conspiracy theorists” if they enjoy the content you share.

        • Alex Jones and The Young Turks can both be wrong, it’s not an either or…

          (To put it another way, I voted for neither Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump…)

          The problem with “conspiracy theory” and “white nationalism” is that both have reared their ugly heads in spaces where men are trying to discuss gynocentrism and both derail the conversation.

  3. Great post. I particularly agree with the conclusion:
    2.“Exposure to information supporting conspiracy theories increased feelings of powerlessness”
    If you percieve anything as beyond your control then you are going to feel powerless because of it. Reading up on shape-shifting aliens does not empower you, because you can’t do anything about them. They’re always there like a Godzilla type figure: domineering and beyond the realm of control or interaction.

    • Reading up on shape-shifting aliens does not empower you, because you can’t do anything about them. They’re always there like a Godzilla type figure: domineering and beyond the realm of control or interaction.

      Your Godzilla analogy makes a lot of sense. One thing I haven’t seen from conspiracy theorists is their plan for dealing with whatever conspiracy they think is running everything. (The only exception I have seen are Christian conspiracy theorists who think that Jesus will magically come down and take care of it. This is something else that encourages apathy since why bother doing anything if Jesus will come down and save you?) If conspiracy theorists were even 10% correct, then a massive genocidal atrocity is about to happen and stopping that atrocity and anyone behind it should be their number one goal. Stopping this atrocity is impossible since their “enemy” for all intents and purposes has magical powers. Any motivation and ability can be pinned on to shapeshifting reptiles (or demons or whatever else they think is running everything) so conspiracy theorists have created a story where their “enemy” is impossible to defeat and can have absurd motivations that violate everything we know about human psychology and sociology.

      It seems like what conspiracy theorists want is not to stop an atrocity from happening but to have everyone dragged off to a FEMA camp so they can say “I told you so.” And that’s assuming they believe what they’re peddling and lying about being persecuted to appear edgy and cool.

      • Yeah that’s it to a tee. (You explained it more fully and lucidly than I could). I mean what good is becoming aware of something unless you can at the very least interact with it, let alone modify it? That’s not to say that all who believe in Shape-Shifting aliens don’t do something about it. There’s a site called http://www.educate-yourself.org that sells crystals which people can use to create ‘positive energy’ which can be used to counter the malevolent forces in the world. Regardless of whether the crystals are effective or not displays some kind of ‘pro active’ attitude, and not the more prevalent masochistic attitude that haunts theorists.

        ‘If conspiracy theorists were even 10% correct, then a massive genocidal atrocity is about to happen ‘

        And if you give that it’s psychological term then it’s called Catastrophism (ie there’s always some great disaster ‘just’ about to happen). It’s the kind of mindset that deprives you of your memory (which would allow you to see that the same story has been sold to you before) and hinges on the plausible/’what if?’ meme (which makes you feel uncertain and anxious and thus more likely to believe the story).

        And I just noticed something else: all of them share the victimhood mentality in common, ie ‘I am being oppressed by something that is beyond my control’. Maybe that’s a sign of the times, a sign of the extent that the female victimhood mentality has become prevalent throughout many aspects of culture.

        • I dated a girl who was into crystal healing. She was an Ojibwa and a former “dancer” so I don’t know if one kind of crazy caused the other, or vice-versa.

  4. “what conspiracy theorists want is not to stop an atrocity from happening but to have everyone dragged off to a FEMA camp so they can say “I told you so.””

    Youtube is full of these “reptilian” crazies. They seem to be mostly Alex Jones followers. The only people FEMA should be ass-raping is THEM(if anyone). Sometimes I wonder if the average age of the vast majority of Youtube commenters is even 2 digits….

  5. My only beef about this is – which comes first – the chicken or the egg…

    That is, do people who feel helpless fabricate conspiracies, or do conspiracies lead to a feeling of helplessness – or both?

  6. ybm said:
    I don’t know if one kind of crazy caused the other, or vice-versa.

    ScareCrow said:
    My only beef about this is – which comes first – the chicken or the egg…

    Who knows. There’ve been plenty of calls of ‘Jesus is Coming!’ over the past millenium so it’s quite possible that the type of personality who believed those Catastrophes were the same type of personality that believe modern day Catastrophes/Conspiracy Theories. A particular personality is going to make you more likely to think and act in a certain way: be open minded. Open mindedness is a double-edged sword, you can either end up believing in ‘Germ Theory’ (true) instead of ‘Bad Air’ (false), or you could end up believing in the ‘Illuminati’ (false) instead of ‘Misandric family laws’ (true). It depends on how much each individual is willing to scrutinise their new beliefs before accepting or rejecting them. Unfortunately some Conspiracy Theorists accept their new beliefs too soon before testing them sufficiently.

    Create a Hypothesis > Test Hypothesis > Accept or Reject Hypothesis

  7. The MRM attracts conspiracy theorists, because is itself based on a conspiracy theory. In fact, the metaphor of the red pill is widely used by conspiracy theories. The way I see it: some conspiracy theories are true, some are probably true, and some are false. If the truth is bad for politics, then so much worse for politics; if the truth is bad for activism, then so much worse for activism.

    Why do I say MRM is base on conspiracy theories?

    Because it goes against the mainstream assumptions. It implies a massive and well covered up conspiracy against men and in favor of women. That is why MRM is so difficult to swallow.

    • Because it goes against the mainstream assumptions.

      That is not the definition of a conspiracy theory.

      It implies a massive and well covered up conspiracy against men and in favor of women.

      The MRM implies no such thing. Everything feminism has done is out in the open, and there is no single feminist effort. There are many feminist organizations and individuals. Nearly all women are feminists.

      Why is it every conspiracy theorists sooner or later, usually sooner, resorts to semantic tricks to defend conspiracy theory?

      • “Why is it every conspiracy theorists sooner or later, usually sooner, resorts to semantic tricks to defend conspiracy theory?”

        Explain please – or give a link – are you referring to the person who just commented?

        • Yes, I am referring to the person above, but he’s hardly the only example.

          I’m tired of hearing the same lies from conspiracy theorists that conspiracy theory is just about non-mainstream ideas or that conspiracy theorist is a pejorative term. The fact that conspiracy theorists have to resort to such tricks is proof that conspiracy theory is a fraud.

  8. [conspiracy theory is a fraud.]

    What a completely ridiculous statement. Conspiracy theory covers a massive subject area, which is exactly why the term was popularised in the first place, so that idiots like you can make unfounded moronic statements like the one above. Many conspiracy theories have been proven as facts.

    You are another cog in the apathy wheel, and you know it.

      • @tamerlame Yes, they are. That’s exactly why most of them are propagated: to discourage people from finding the 5% that actually have merit. No, not “da joos” nor the reptilians or some shit like that, but some high-degree criminals that have widespread connections inside the governmental institutions. Flat Earth? Gimme a break! But the 9/11 attacks and the following wars are pretty hard to take at face value…

  9. For a scholar, a theory is only a device that assists in attempting to organize thoughts along the path of studying and understanding FACTS in context. The study of real evidence cannot be done without interpretation — interpretation that changes and deepens the more is understood. The difference between the work of a shallow, unseasoned dilettante and a broadly experienced scholar who understands the centrality of “knowing what one does not know” is great. What is to be avoided in all areas of inquiry in all fields is shallowness, short attention span, ideological bias, simplemindedness, incuriosity and rigidity.

  10. Pingback: Belief in the cultural Marxist conspiracy theory is the reason why feminists are in power. | De-constructing the male dominance hierarchy.

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